I’ve been brainstorming the best way to say what I’ve learned the past year in the kitchen, and continue to learn, and how these experiences bring me to deeper levels of consciousness, and of fulfilling my dream to make a home. I suppose my goal is to encourage, inspire, provoke my readers to feel delighted and excited by homemade food. Your own homemade food. And the potential in this work. There’s an amazing vegetarian cook book I bought before I got married – The New Laurel’s Kitchen, by Laurel Robertson, Carol Flinders, and Brian Ruppenthal, 1986, Ten Speed Press, Berkeley, California. The preface presents the greatest goal of home-cooking with love for loved ones: it creates place (home) to antidote the demands of time, money and all other things our culture of materialism threatens in destroying family, relationships and “almost everything else that makes life worth living.” Although the authors, writing in the 80s, hadn’t yet seen all the glamor that our generation would give to food, stresses of time and materialism and broken down families haven’t improved. And for most of us, long hours in the kitchen is still emasculating for men, and oppressive for women. Aside from that, who has the time? But I’m talking to people who want to be different from what our culture allows. If you’re willing to go against some impulses, you can make your life worth living in the kitchen.

We’re all in the same boat, men and women alike. We want homes, communities, places of acceptance. We need places of retreat. We want those nutritious meals that take a long time to make and are filled with love and support. We have to dedicate ourselves to this.

My interest in food begins with creating home, but covers so many other aspects, such as, creativity: food as art; biology: food as medicine – the particular healing properties of every natural food; religion: food as connection to the Source of our sustenance, and meditation.

Maybe in future blogs I’ll discuss the following things: how I transitioned from freezer food to spending full days in the kitchen; research and opinions on the positive effects of home cooking; inspiration for a more wholesome lifestyle; recipes; food isms – macrobiotics, raw, vegetarianism, ethnic eating, weight loss eating, keeping kosher, and other rituals; tips for nutrition and health related issues; and whatever else my readers may suggest.

I really look forward to the community this blog has the potential to create. Let’s do it together.